Snapshots: The Art of Losing Oneself to Sardinia

Snapshots: The Art of Losing Oneself to Sardinia

The art of getting lost is an easy task if you don’t know where you are going and are not prepared to get lost. I don’t get lost as much as I used to, like that time in Dublin, Copenhagen, Australia or even Brasil. The art of losing oneself in Sardinia is spectacular, mind-boggling and a full frontal attack on all human senses. I often lose myself to the spectacular panorama, the rising sun or the setting full-moon, the endless crashing of waves and even in a plate of traditional gnocchi Sardi topped with aged pecorino cheese and a glass or two of cannonau (Sardinia’s earthy, red wine).

What I don’t do, ever, is get lost in a maze like the photo below.
jennifer-avventura-my-sardinian-life-2016

I prefer to walk on the road often traveled, however, every once in awhile I like stray from the path to adventures unknown with my trusted Sardinian sidekick showing me the way.

Go on and get lost, just be sure to come back and tell me all about it.

Which road would you prefer to walk on?

An Open Love Letter to Sardinia

An Open Love Letter to Sardinia

GirasoleIt’s good to be back in your arms, with your wide open rugged coastline lapped in refreshing turquoise waters and your jagged mountain peeks where I sit 365 meters above sea-level. I’m restoring my faith in you, dear Sardinia, to bring me back to that place, you know that one, that little special place we hold so tight and dear.

It has been 2.5 years since we touched souls, and you haven’t changed a bit. You still glow, like summer’s first kiss, and you’ve welcomed me back with flair, graciousness and that inquisitive curiosity that I so fell in love with that first time back in 2008.

I can hear your locally made bells twang in the distance, around the neck of your goat who is languidly walking down the mountain. Your local dialect, a symphony of flair and history floats on the mountain air, sending wisps of words into my living room.

I’ve tasted your delicacies that I’ve so longed for: Ichnusa, pane carasau, cannonau, mountain water, pecorino, espresso, olive oil, peaches, pane and the list could go on. It’s been an assault on my senses just reuniting with you, I hope you feel the same way.

These last five days with you in the mountains has been spectacular. You’ve helped me realign my body, focus my energy and restore my soul. Now, it’s time for the beach.

Thank you, Sardinia, it’s good to be here.

Love

Jennifer Avventura
xoxo

Top 10 things I miss the most about Sardinia

Top 10 things I miss the most about Sardinia

It’s the little things that I miss the most about Sardinia, and seven months later I’m still heartbroken over leaving her beautiful, mysterious land. Considering I’m feeling all sorts of nostalgia over my breakup, I’ve decided to compile a short top 10 list of what I miss the most about her.

Jennifer Avventura

Top 10 Things I miss the most about Sardinia

  1. Saying buongiorno when entering any type of shop.
  2. The Mediterranean smell of her salt water hair.
  3. A perfectly poured espresso with a mirto chaser.
  4. The sloping red, granite landscape.
  5. Pasta, oh yes, pasta!
  6. The earthy, dirty red known as Cannonau.
  7. Swimming in the crystal, clear, clean waters only known unto her.
  8. Her secret and seductive language.
  9. Seadas, seadas, seadas!
  10. Her humble and hospitable people.

I lived on her land for six long, beautiful years and there is not a day that passes that I don’t think or daydream about her. I’ve set foot on countless countries but Sardinia really, truly stole my heart.

Have you recently re-expatriated? How are your feelings of nostalgia?

My secret love affair with Sardinia’s red wines

My secret love affair with Sardinia’s red wines

I’m not going to lie. I love Cannonau so much that it runs through my veins like blood. Heck, even Dr. Oz spoke about the health benefits of the Cannonau variety on his show – stating that if you drink Cannonau you could live to 100 years of age! I must admit, the amount of Cannonau I’ve drunk in the last week will skyrocket me to 200 years of age!

Cannonau grape varieties are the most common variety found on the island. All Cannonau must be made with 90% Cannonau grapes to be certified with the Cannonau name. Cannonau is aged in oak barrels for one year before gracing tables with its strong elegance.

Here are three of my favourite Sardinian reds:

Jennifer Avventura cannonau

Left:

Cagnulari 2010 – Alghero, Sardinia, Italy. This is a rare grape type grown in the north-western part of Sardinia and is used to produce a sexy, full-bodied red wine. This variety is seldom found outside of Sardinia and considered a regional speciality. Be sure to try it!

Center:

Terre Rare 2010 – Alghero, Sardinia, Italy. This grape variety was introduced to Sardinia by Provence or eastern Spain. Carignano del Sulcis vines grow abundantly in the south-west corner of Sardinia.

Right:

Cannonau di Sardegna 2010 – Alghero, Sardinia, Italy. Sardinia’s most popular variety is this sensuous full-bodied wine. Some say the Cannonau grape variety was introduced by the Spaniards in the 1400′s during Spanish rule. Others argue that Cannonau is indigenous to Sardinia. It doesn’t matter who is right in this battle, as one thing remains clear: Cannonau is one spectacular wine not to be missed on the island of Sardinia.

My favourites:

Have you sampled this fine wine from Sardinia? Can you find this variety in your local wine shop?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Unique Sardinia

From the deep reds of Jerzu to traditional sweets from the Gallura; in love goats and skulls on a hiking path. Sardinia is a beautifully unique island – and I’m looking forward to exploring more of her hidden secrets.

This is my response to the Weekly Photo Challenge – Unique.

What does unique mean to you?

Sardinia, Italy | A Blue Zones Member

Last week I wrote an article titled, Top 11 Reasons Why Living in Sardinia, Italy Rocks and my eleventh reason why I thought living in Sardinia is the bee’s knee’s is that Sardinia is one of the world’s healthiest places to live. Pretty fantastic, no?

I’ve dug a little deeper into the study of World’s Healthiest Places to Live and have learned that American explorer Dan Buettner, (who had cycled his way all over the world a few times) had started a study in demographics and longevity thus beginning his research into “the blue zones,” his idea of cultures that have the longest life expectancy.

He found himself in Sardinia at the beginning of the study and soon realized that Sardinia has, and always has had a large population of centenarian’s in the world. It is in these ‘blue zones’ that people reach the age of 100, ten times more than those in the United States.

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Sardinian BBQ in December

This past weekend we were invited back to the 12lb Snapper House for a traditional Sardinian BBQ. Being Canadian and one who was brought up on the best BBQ’s the world has to offer, I was excited to try a traditional Sardinian BBQ.

Ajo. Andemu in Cuzina per cena. Maureddu ha lu carne, e voule fare un BBQ. My husband said to me in his barbaric dialect.

Come on! We are going to the kitchen for dinner. Maureddu has meat, and he wants to have a BBQ.

I was a little thrown off as the 12 lb Snapper house is a bachelor pad with a nice fireplace, a sofa and a big screen on the wall but no BBQ. I figured ok, what the heck and left it to the two Sardinian guys and opened a bottle of Cannonau.

Sardinian BBQ

We are having a BBQ in the family fireplace? Continue reading

Where Wine is Born

Sardegna is where wine is born. It is where the oldest wine in the Mediterranean is produced and it is here where the tales begin. Some say the Cannonau grape variety was introduced by the Spaniards in the 1400’s during Spanish rule. Others argue that Cannonau is indigenous to Sardegna. It doesn’t matter who is right in this battle as one thing remains clear: Cannonau is one spectacular wine not to be missed on the island of Sardegna.

Sardinian Vineyard in Summer

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