Finding the Simple in Sardinia, Italy

It’s the simple stuff that I’ve found in Sardinia that brings me the most peace. Take for example this dirt path to the sea, with colours so vivid it seems quite like the set of a Hollywood film. It’s the simple stuff in Sardinia where I love to get lost, because our senses become so alive that our brain goes into overdrive trying to decipher the beauty before our eyes.

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How Virtual Tourist Opened My Eyes to Inspiration

This is a guest post I wrote back in November 2011 for Canada’s Adventure Couple – Dave & Deb it was published on their super fab site earlier this week. This was my first guest post I’ve written and was great to see my post on their site.

How Virtual Tourist Opened My Eyes to Inspiration

“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” Confucius.

Sometimes, in life there are too many ‘what if’ moments. Moments where we find ourselves questioning motives, desires, yearnings, personal histories, and the what if I do, do it. What then?

Confucius was right in his statement. To become a traveler, you must take that first step. After that, the adventure is yours.

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Sardinia, Italy | A Blue Zones Member

Last week I wrote an article titled, Top 11 Reasons Why Living in Sardinia, Italy Rocks and my eleventh reason why I thought living in Sardinia is the bee’s knee’s is that Sardinia is one of the world’s healthiest places to live. Pretty fantastic, no?

I’ve dug a little deeper into the study of World’s Healthiest Places to Live and have learned that American explorer Dan Buettner, (who had cycled his way all over the world a few times) had started a study in demographics and longevity thus beginning his research into “the blue zones,” his idea of cultures that have the longest life expectancy.

He found himself in Sardinia at the beginning of the study and soon realized that Sardinia has, and always has had a large population of centenarian’s in the world. It is in these ‘blue zones’ that people reach the age of 100, ten times more than those in the United States.

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