8 things you should know before moving to Sardinia, Italy

Sardinia_MapThis blog My Sardinian Life receives daily hits from people looking to move to Sardinia, Italy. So, I’ve compiled a little list for those out there searching for a life less ordinary in paradise. The search engine terms which brought people to my little blog are always written in English: Sardinia cost of living, move to Sardinia, jobs Sardinia and so on.

Canada, England, Australia and America want ‘in’ on this little island secret but before you pack your bags, take these pointers into consideration. My intention with this post is to put into perspective what day-to-day life is like on the most stunning island in the world – Sardinia, Italy. Disclaimer: these are just my opinions.  Continue reading

When is the best time to visit Sardinia?

Sardinia is known for its long summer, turquoise coloured warm waters, 200 days of sunshine and an average yearly temperature that will melt any Canadian’s heart. So, when is the best time to visit this magical island in the Mediterranean?

Average Monthly Climate in Sardinia, Italy

Average Temps Sardinia-page-001

Let’s break the year up into groups of four to see what it really looks like in Sardinia.

January-March

These three months are the coldest, wettest and most windy of the year. Locals busy themselves collecting wood to keep them warm during the drabbest months of the year.

April – June

This is my favourite time of year in Sardinia, the birds are singing and the town is filled with smiling happy people and the temperatures are warm enough for jeans and a t-shirt. It’s also the time for my favourite Sardinian festival of the year – Cavalcata Sarda.

July – September

These three months are undoubtably the hottest and busiest of the year. The sun is shining all day, every day and the beaches are filled with global beach goers. It’s the perfect time to chill seaside with the perfect novel.

October – December

October and November are iffy months. We’ve been known to spend an afternoon on the beach in November while the following day is filled with thunder, hail and lightning storms.

When will you visit Sardinia?

How to Make Tomato Sauce Like an Italian

Five years ago, I thought tomato sauce came from a can, jar or my Mothers kitchen. Today, that is a different story, for I have mastered the fine art of Italian tomato sauce. With all good Italian things, one requires patience and persistence.

If this is your first time making tomato sauce, I wish you luck and I hope my step-by-step photo guide helps.

I love Italian cooking and eating. I am a Canadian, who learned the fine art of Italian tomato sauce by trial and error, and a lot of questions. And this is what I came up with, I hope you enjoy.

How to Make Tomato Sauce Like an Italian

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How to Arrive in Sunny Sardinia, Italy

Sardinia is the second largest island in the Mediterranean, and has three international airports which service major cities in Italy and many other European destinations like: Spain, England, Ireland and Germany.

International Airports in Sardinia, Italy

  1. Alghero Airport (AHO)
  2. Oblia Airport (OLB)
  3. Cagliari-Elmas Airport (CAG)

Airlines with direct routes to Sardinia from Europe:

  1. Meridiana Fly – is based in Olbia, Sardinia. Meridiana connects the traveler to major cities in Italy, Germany, Spain, England, France and Russia.
  2. EasyJet is a British airline with its headquarters at the London Luton Airport. EasyJet services Sardinia with Gatwick-Olbia and Stansted-Cagliari flights.
  3. Ryanair is Europe’s leading discount airline. Daily flights from all over Europe to Alghero and Cagliari.
  4. Alitalia is based in Fiumicino, Italy and operates at Rome’s major international airport Fiumicino (FCO). Alitalia connects to many major large cities around the world. Alitalia connects the traveler, daily to Sardinia through: Olbia, Alghero and Cagliari.
  5. SmartWings is another low cost airline based out of Prague. They have direct flights from Prague to all three main airports in Sardinia.
  6. British Airways offers charter flights in collaboration with Sardatur Holidays from London Heathrow/Manchester to Olbia/Cagliari.

By Sea:

  1. Moby Lines offers daily voyages from these Italian mainland ports: Livorno, Piombino, Genova, Civitavecchia, Bonifacio to Olbia, Santa Teresa di Gallura, and Porto Torres.
  2. Tirrenia offers daily ferries between mainland ports in Italy and Sardinia. Routes include: Porto Torres-Genova, Cagliari-Palmero, Cagliari-Napoli, Oblia-Civitavecchia, Oblia-Genova, Arbatax-Genova and Arbatax-Civitavecchia and many more!
  3. Corsica Ferries offers crossings from Santa Teresa di Gallura to Bonifacio and Olbia to Livorno.

Safe and Happy Travels.

*Please note: during the off-season months some routes and timetables may change. Please check with your carrier of choice for further details.

How will you arrive on this magnificent island in the Mediterranean?

VIDEO – Eating the Head of a 12LB Sardinian Snapper

I few months ago I wrote a post titled: How to Eat a 12lb Sardinian Snapper. Today, I have added the video. Watch one of my Sardinian friends dig into this massive head.

Do you have the courage?

How to Hunt for Wild Sardinian Asparagus

Three and a half years ago I went on my first asparagus hunting excursion, it was painful. I came home with squinty eyes and a headache and vowed never to do it again.

The first few years was like trying to find a needle in a haystack. I actually detested going out, but that waned with each new dish prepared. Now, I am a pro. Yes, a pro-asparagus hunter and I love each moment.

Follow me on a voyage to hunt for one of Sardinia’s wild vegetables.

How to Hunt for Wild Sardinian Asparagus

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How to make a Bamboo Ladder | DIY

I’ve never been good at designing things or working with my hands, despite the fact that I enjoy working with my hands. However, generally the outcome is not what I had imagined at the beginning. So, maybe you can imagine my joy when I finally put my latest idea to the test.

Bamboo is a wonderful, quick-growing, giant, versatile plant that grows in abundance in Sardinia. One year ago Hub was heading into the mountains with a friend. I asked him to collect me some wild, Sardinian bamboo. He came back with half a truck load.

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The Rule of Thirds | Understanding Photography

Photography has been a hobby for some years and I’ll be the first to admit that I know nothing of this snappy profession. What I do know is that I love to take pictures, of anything, and everything.

A few days ago I went shutter happy on some beautiful cows and calf’s in the hilly mountains of Sardinia, Italy. I then asked for some advice.

Michele over at Our Italian Table offered me the best advice a beginner could ask for!

The Rule of Thirds – A Beginners Guide

  • When you look through the viewfinder, or the LCD display on the back of your digital camera; imagine a perfect tic-tac-toe board displayed. (Most digital cameras have a grid setting which will display the grid automatically for you … hey, I found mine, you can to.)
  • The first horizontal line, at the top is the Eye Line. This is where you put your subject’s eye, line.
  • The second horizontal line, at the bottom is the Horizon Line. This is where you want to level your horizon.
  • You can play with the horizon on both horizontal lines, it all depends on what type of photography you wish for the final picture.
  • A high horizon line creates depth in the photo.
  • A low horizon line helps eliminate boring foregrounds.

Rule of thumb

The experts agree, if you want a dynamite photograph that pops out from the page, or a photo that expresses justly a moment in time – then do not center your subject in the middle of your grid.

By centering the subject in the middle of the grid, you are creating a static photo. A static photo has no depth, movement or flow. A static photo is boring, and who wants boring? I don’t.

Remember …

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How to tell you’ve had a good time at Carnival | Tempio Pausania, Sardinia, Italy

How do you define a good time? Is it with music or dance? Is singing in your repertoire? What if we combine all those ingredients and throw a six-day festival in honour of a dead King?

The party starts here:

The festival parade of masks and floats generally occurs before Lent. People of all ages and walks of life come out to celebrate the King of Carnival – King George (or Giorgio if you’re in Italy). Many of the ancient traditions have disappeared over the centuries, but one thing clearly stays the same –  Carnevale Tempiese, The Carnival of Tempio Pausania.

Tempio Pausania is in the Gallura region of northern Sardinia and is the administrative capital (along with Olbia) making the province of Olbia-Tempio.

The 14,000 inhabitants know how to throw an impressive Carnival and have shown up by the thousands to pay homage (and party) in honour of the King.

In just a few weeks time people from all over Europe will take part in dance, costume and play, at one of Sardinia’s biggest celebrations, after brushing out the winter cobwebs and hailing in the new sun shine.

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How Not to Make Sardinian Seadas

Seadas or Sebadas is a traditional Sardinian dessert made with flour, fresh sheep cheese, honey and lemon zest.

Seadas is a dessert similar to ravioli and is produced mainly in the areas where shepherds roam. Pecorino is sheep cheese, it’s strong in flavour and the perfect filler for the seadas. If you can’t find pecorino in your local supermarket, try looking for a strong cheese for the filler.

How NOT to Make Sardinian Seadas. Continue reading