Sardinia’s Blue Flag Beaches 2016

Sardinia’s Blue Flag Beaches 2016

Sardinia has done it again with an impressive 28 Blue Flags flying effortlessly around her turquoise coast. That is 21 more blue flags since 2013, so there is plenty of beach to play for those seeking a little vitamin sea in the heart of the Mediterranean.

What is a Blue Flag?

2000px-Blue_Flag_Logo.svgThe Blue Flag is a world-renowned eco-certification awarded to beaches and marinas in countless countries across Europe, South Africa, Morocco, Tunisia, New Zealand, Brazil, Canada and the Caribbean.

When you see a Blue Flag flying, you know a beach or marina is clean and accessible; has great water quality; meets high safety standards; and is working hard to protect local shorelines and ecosystems. Blue Flags are flying at 25 beaches and six marinas in Canada.

Beaches are awarded the blue flag based on several criteria which the beach must meet; should the beach fail to comply with these criteria during the year, the blue flag can be withdrawn. Here are just a few of the criteria needed:

  • Environmental Education and Information
  • Water Quality
  • Environmental Management
  • Safety and Services

It takes a strong community and desire to keep these beaches immaculate. These 28 beaches are sparkling gems from Sardinia’s coastal populations. Please enjoy responsibly.

28 Blue Flag Beaches: Sardinia 2013-2016
(by province)

Cagliari

  • Poetto, Quartu Sant’ Elena
  • Mare Pintau, Quartu Sant’ Elena
  • Portu Tramatzu, Teulada
  • Sabbie Bianche, Teulada
  • Tuerredda, Teulada

Oblia-Tempio

La Rena Bianca by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life

Rena Bianca

  • Spiaggia di Li Junchi, Badesi
  • L’Isuledda, Porto Pollo
  • La Sciumara, Palau
  • Foce Fiume Liscia, Palau
  • Palau Vecchio, Palau
  • Spiaggia dei due Mari, Isola Caprera
  • Spiaggia del Relitto, Isola Caprera
  • Porto Lungo, La Maddalena
  • Spalmatore, La Maddalena
  • Rena Ponente, Capo Testa
  • Rena Bianca, Capo Testa
  • Zia Culumba, Capo Testa

Ogliastra

  • Lido di Cea, Tortoli
  • Lido di Orri, Tortoli
  • Muxi, Tortoli
  • Orri Foxilioni, Tortoli
  • La Capannina or Potente, Arbatax
  • Porto Frailia, Arbatax

Oristano

  • Spiaggia di Torregrande, Oristano

Sassari

Rena Bianca

Rena Bianca

  • Marina di Sorso, Sorso
  • Madonnina/Stella Maris, Castelsardo
  • Sacro Cuore/Ampurias, Castelsardo
  • Porto Ferro, Sassari

There you have it! 28 stunning stretches of sand, sea and sun to sink your feet into. Which beach(s) have you set foot on?

Useful links:
Programma Bandiera Blu – Sardegna
FEE – Foundation for Environmental Education Italia

Travel Theme: Symbol from Sardinia

Sardinia has a beautiful overabundance of symbols dotted throughout the island. There remains very little written data on the history of symbolism in Sardinia; I couldn’t find any information on this symbol, anywhere on the internet!

So, I sent the photo to a trusted friend and this is what he said “The stele was found at the foot of the pyramid or ziggurat – “Monte d’Accoddi,” the north side, in 1979. There is only an interpretation that it could be a female deity but nothing certain as to its purpose. The original is in the museum at Sassari.”

She remains a mystery, this beautiful and interesting deity.

Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (8)

A special thanks to Tharros.info for the trusted explanation of this symbol. 🙂

Jennifer Avventura

Front and back of the “deity.” This was on a poster at Monte d’Accoddi where the stele was found.

I wish there was more concrete evidence of the life the islanders lived eons ago. I wish I could step back in time and witness Sardinia’s future in the making. I wish to run with wild horses over the range of Gennargentu.

This is my response to the Weekly Travel Theme: Symbol.

Street art from Sassari, Sardinia

Street art from Sassari, Sardinia

Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life

Simply breathtaking this little side street, and what a wonderful surprise to find such artwork displayed on a wall, outside.

How do you like your street art? Bright and flashy or classic like in the above photo?

Learning Italian: At the Gynecologist

Learning Italian: At the Gynecologist

Continuing on from the super successful post on Learning Italian: You said what?, I thought it only fair to share another one of my embarrassing moments from my expat life Sardinia. This story involves vagina’s and doctors, so if you are easily offended I suggest you click here and if you’re one of the millions of weirdo’s who gets giggles out of others’ follies then, by all means, please read on.

At the Gynecologist the first time:

We had just driven an hour into Sassari and we were lost. All the buildings looked the same, they looked like pale, sick apartment buildings not a doctor’s office, there wasn’t even a sign. A young woman came walking down the street and stops in front of us “Lèi e Jennifer?” With a rather perplexed look on my face, I nodded yes. “Sono dottoressa Venere.”

I followed her into the cold, dusty archway and whispered to my husband “This is a little weird.” He nodded and continued on my heel.

Dr. Venere opened an ancient wooden door to reveal a small apartment turned into a gynaecologist office: one tiny bathroom, one bedroom and a living room/waiting room, it felt like I was in the doctor’s apartment. The red sofa stood out against the white walls in the waiting room and she said to my husband “Lei signore resta qui.” Dr Venere pointed to the luscious sofa and gave my husband a wink. Yes, a wink! I decided to ignore it.

She gestured for me to follow her and I obeyed her stern look. She opened her bedroom door and in place of a bed was a canary yellow gynaecological examination table complete with remote control and pillow.

Togliti i pantaloni e sedersi lì.” Say what? What she say? I’d only been in Italy for a year and my grasp on the Italian language consisted of: Io, pasta, pizza, ciao, mi piace, tu and spagetti. The examination table reminded me of Big Bird and I was scared.

Pantaloni. Pants? Yes, she wanted me to take off my pants, right! She can’t check out my vagina if my pants are on, why isn’t she leaving the room?

The doctors in Canada leave the room when a patient gets naked and provides a lovely, white paper robe. I gathered enough courage to ask her “un vesitito? one dress?” as I pointed to the recyclable white paper adorning the yellow chair.

She looked at me quizzically, pointed her pen at my waist and motioned for me to remove my pants and sit down as the procedure was about to begin.

Santorini, Greece 2005 by Jennifer AvventuraI was mortified.

How could I do this without a dressing gown? I’ve never done it without a dressing gown! WAH! Cue internal freak-out and escape plan.

She was staring at me, I was staring at her, and the Big Bird chair was staring at my vagina. Somebody help me!

I did what I always do in situations like this – throw caution to the wind and just do it. After all, this is Italy, and I learned a new word that day: pantaloni = pants.

Are you an expat? What was different on your first visit to the doctors?

Stay tuned for more horror stories from the gynecologist’s office.

© My Sardinian Life/Jennifer Avventura. All rights reserved 2010-2017. All pictures, unless otherwise stated, are property of My Sardinian Life. Do not use without written permission.

Sardinia and Google Maps – So what’s all the fuss?

Sardinia and Google Maps – So what’s all the fuss?

*Update – Google has responded. As of Oct.14.2013 all town names are now in Italian.

There’s a bit of a fuss over the new Google Maps, Sardinia. I noticed last week when I searched for a map of Sardinia; I wanted to re-create the route I had driven the weekend before and entered in:

sstonara

And was shown this:

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Inside the heart of Sardinia – Toneri, Tonara

Tonara by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian LifeI caught the bus early Saturday morning to meet up with a friend in Sassari. We filled the car with an expensive tank of gas and headed south down SS131 towards the elusive province of Barbagia in the heart of Sardinia. We headed to an ‘open-house’ in the ancient neighbourhood of Toneri, Tonara in the province of Nuoro.

It is here, in the heart of Sardinia, where you can immerse yourself in a world of historical flavours, ancient traditions, narrow alleyways and spectacular views of the surrounding mountains. It’s also here where they make the world-famous torrone but I’m saving that juicy, delicious bit for another post.

Welcome to Autunno in Barbagia

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Snapshots: Strolling the Streets of Sassari

Sassari is the second-largest city in Sardinia, and to us small town mountain dwellers who venture here on such brief occasions, it’s called the big city or the big smoke. I enjoy getting lost in the streets of Sassari, there are beautiful surprises around every corner from classical art to street art and must-see energetic festivals that will leave you gasping for more. Follow me, on yet, another photographic voyage of this striking city.

Strolling the Streets of Sassari

When I need to aimlessly wander ancient cobblestone streets, I come here to gaze at local art and sip an apertivo.

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Medieval Sardinia: Castello dei Doria, Chiaramonti, Sassari

There is very little information on the history of Castello dei Doria, but what remains clear is: this magnificent castle perched on the hill of St. Matthew in the province of Sassari, Sardinia is a stunning piece of medieval history and a must-see for every traveler to the area. Admission free, with panoramic views all around.

The castle was named after Eleanora of Arborea‘s mother-in-law Giacomina Doria. Eleanora of Arborea is a renowned heroin to many of the islands’ residents. From 1383 to her death, she was one of the most powerful judges in Sardinian history.

Castello dei Doria, Chiaramonti

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life

It’s an impressive building dating back to the 12th century when the Doria family (originally from Liguria) had it built as part of their defensive line in the historical region of Anglona, Sardinia.

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (2)

There are a number of castles and towers all over Sardinia which were built in medieval times to protect against attacks and thieves; like the ruler of Arborea, Mariano IV, who longed to own the castle, as well as King Peter IV of Aragon who in turn, hoped to gain possession of the castle thanks to a marriage in which he had close relations.

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (3)

In 1448 the castle was transformed into a church – The Parish Church of St. Matthew – San Matteo, Chiaramonti.  Today it dominates the valley below with spectacular views from north to south.

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (4)

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (5)

What went on inside these walls during medieval times?

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (6)

Castello dei Doria is rich in legends, story and war. Left for the spirits to tell the tales for a hundred years and more.

Castello dei Doria by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (7)

During my research for this article I found that this castle has, and does go by several names:

  • Castello dei Doria
  • Castello Doria
  • Castel Doria
  • Castello di Chiaramonti
  • Chiaramonti Castle

Have you seen this stunning gem perched high up in the Sardinian sky?

Source: Sardegna.Blogosphere

  • © 2010-2013 Jennifer Avventura All rights reserved.

Prehistoric Sardinia – Monte d’Accoddi

Sardinia is one of the most geologically ancient bodies of land in Europe and in the picturesque province of Sassari lays the prehistoric, megalithic, ziggurat of Monte d’Accoddi.  

The largest and only one in Europe.

Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life Monte d'Accoddi

This megalithic structure dates back to 4000 – 3,650 BC, and was just discovered fifty-nine years ago! It’s been described as an altar, temple or step pyramid.

Reconstruction of the altar started in the 80’s with commission to re-build the top-level of the altar and the straightening of the menhir, which was found on its side.

Monte d'Accoddi by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life

Monte d’Accoddi, Sardegna, Italia

Menhir, Monte d'Accoddi

Menhir, Monte d’Accoddi

The gigantic oval stone “was brought to the site years after the altar was discovered in 1954.” Said someone at the site.

Oval stone at Monte d'Accoddi

Oval stone at Monte d’Accoddi

I’m left questioning … “what was really going on at this giant prehistoric altar?”

To me, the menhir symbolizes strength within a society –  man, whereas the oval stone is the entrance to the gateway of life – woman.

What do you think?

Ponder this while you take in the view from the top of Monte d’Accoddi.

Monte d'Accoddi by Jennifer Avventura My Sardinian Life (2)

What happened at Monte d’Accoddi?

P.S. Sardinia not just breathtaking beaches and emerald coasts.

Sources:

Tharros.info – Photo Gallery Prehistorical altar of Monte d’Accoddi 
Wikipedia – Monte d’Accoddi

  • © 2010-2013 Jennifer Avventura All rights reserved.

Sassy Sassari a Photographic Day Trip

Sassy Sassari, Sardinia, Italy

Sassari – a sprawling city on the northwest coast of Sardinia, population 130,000. Sassari is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Sardinia. Sassari is a city rich in art, history and culture and the economy relies heavily on tourism.

Duomo di Sassari – San Nicola

During the day, in the summer months, these steps are filled with tourists, locals and young children enjoying a refreshing gelato. But at night, when the tourists, locals and children are in bed is when this duomo comes to life.

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