How Not to Make Sardinian Seadas

Seadas or Sebadas is a traditional Sardinian dessert made with flour, fresh sheep cheese, honey and lemon zest.

Seadas is a dessert similar to ravioli and is produced mainly in the areas where shepherds roam. Pecorino is sheep cheese, it’s strong in flavour and the perfect filler for the seadas. If you can’t find pecorino in your local supermarket, try looking for a strong cheese for the filler.

How NOT to Make Sardinian Seadas.

  1. Do not attempt to make Seadas if you are not Sardinian. ( This is my humble opinion. The best Sardinian dishes come from, well, the Sards themselves.)
  2. Do not share four bottles of Sardinia’s best red, Turriga, with Italian friends from Padova.
  3. Do not attempt to make seadas at 9pm, after consumption of said wine.
  4. Do not use regular flour to make the dough. You need special flour, semola. Using regular flour will make the dough too soft.
  5. Do not fry seadas at midnight. See number 2.

Midnight Seadas

Seadas is similar to ravioli. It is lightly fried, to melt the pecorino cheese. Once fried, honey is drizzled on top, giving off a strong (pecorino) and sweet (honey) flavour that will leave you begging for more.

Want to know how to make seadas like the Sardinians? Not like me, who is Canadian and can only bake banana bread.

Check out the following link. This site is in Italian: Seadas.it. There is a wealth of information on how-to’s in making seadas.

If you don’t like that link follow this one: Seadas Sarde. This is a recipe from Barilla the fine makers of Italian pasta.

Will I try to make this heavenly dessert again? Only unless a Sardinian is holding my hand during the process.

Seadas is truly a magnificent dessert. The Sards truly knew what they were creating when they invented the Seadas.

Have you tried to bake something that was culturally over your head? How did it turn out?

About Jennifer Avventura

Canadian Freelance writer living in Sardinia, Italy. A serial expat who has lived in Australia, England and Cayman Islands. She eats Nutella with a spoon and hides under the bed during lightning storms. When she's not out running 6k you will find her sitting at the computer - writing her novel and searching for worldwide waitress work.
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18 Responses to How Not to Make Sardinian Seadas

  1. thirdeyemom says:

    Is that a picture of you? I have never seen your face! It is great to finally meet you and see who you are! Thanks for sharing!!!! 🙂

  2. JR says:

    Love rule #2…classic. “sharing is not caring” in this case.

    Sounds yummy, try again.

  3. TBM says:

    If I promise not to attempt to make it, can I still participate in rule 2?

  4. TBM says:

    I’m such a horrible cook that I should always stick to this rule.

  5. Rick Notari says:

    Jenny your Seadas look fine 🙂

  6. The Hook says:

    Admitting you have a problem is the first step…

  7. Paul says:

    Don’t give up…the alternative is hot dogs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  8. joesard says:

    …4 bottles of Turriga at a single dinner party?? Wow who were you entertaining Mr.B.and the top brass of Forza Italia. I won’t disclose how much it costs but I don’t remember having more than 2 bottles of that stuff at my place in the past 20 years – and – in two separate occasions at that. I really hope your hosts appreciated it because its undoubtedly the top rate Sardinian wine and amongst the top fifty of Italy’s best wines. As for the seadas (btw pronounced say-ah-does), well sometimes they can go wrong because the written recipes are usually more like guidelines than a mathematical certainty. You will need a Sardinian housewife to help you choose and dose the ingredients – which being home produced can vary considerably – that is why things go wrong, we don’t have industrial constant (crappy) quality. So the cheese may have more water or salt the flour may be coarsely ground and not needing properly and when cooking the oil temperature and how long you fry them is fundamental. To make it clear many recipes at a certain point may indicate “the rind of 1 lemon” ..easy so what’s the big deal? well over here lemons come off the tree and not from the supermarket counter and can be as small or as large walnut to the size of volley ball (well not quite so). To better your Sardo cooking skills you will need that “occhio” assessment quality which allows you to dose your ingredients so that they “look” ok. 🙂

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