Feasting Sardinian Style

Everyone loves a good nosh and there is no other place in the world where they do food as good as they do here, in Sardegna. The Sardinian natives have for centuries used the land to farm pig, sheep and rabbit. The national dish of Sardegna is the suckling pig, which is a piglet up to six weeks old and still taking milk from its mother. With plenty of pig farms in the surrounding area it’s no wonder the Sardinians know how to throw a good festa. When friends come to dine, with them they bring their slaughtered pig from their decades old farm.

Preparing the Pig

It was difficult to wrap my head around some of the customs in Sardegna, but I am in their land, tis me that must adapt. To prepare the suckling pig, I do what the Sardinians do: climb the nearest mountain and pick fresh myrtle twigs. The myrtle-berry and it’s branches are used extensively in Sardinian cooking adding a unique flavour to the dish. There is nothing more appetizing than home-grown, home cooked meals. Sardinians do their dishes with flare and simplicity, making every meal a meal to remember.

Roasted Myrtle Pig

12 responses

  1. Pingback: Top ten reasons to visit Sardinia | The Sardinia Blog

    • There’s no other choice but adaption. I can’t change a culture or move people to do the things I believe in. I’m not one for the slaughter of animals. I do eat meat, yes. But I could never watch a slaughter of a piglet. I’ve asked my friend who has a pig farm how he does it, it’s sad for me to hear. But for generations that’s what many people around the world have done to survive. I’m not one to judge. Thanks again for commenting and stopping by.

  2. Hahahaha, oh Jen! I often can’t ever find pretty plated pictures of my creations. Before….it was all the wine’s fault. Now? The fact that i have time to still be making meals with love from scratch is a miracle unto itself – the fact that I take some pics and occasionally blog about it is quite another. Pioneer Woman, I’ll never be.

    Anyways, the pig looks DELICIOUS?! And the sticks? I love discovering new traditions when it comes to cooking….Yum!

    • Ciao Selena.
      It’s always the wines fault. I’m good for photo taking at the start of the creation, but when it comes to putting it on the table, that’s another thing. Generally the boys are way to hungry to allow me to play and look at me like ‘what the eff are you talking bout woman!’ So yea, next time I will try to snap a pic after it’s all cooked and yummy. Mirto rocks, not sure if you can get it in Canada though.

  3. Oh, Wow! It reminds me of the Roasted Pig back home cooked in outdoor charcoal. We don’t have Myrtle leaves but we use local herbs. It’s called locally as “Lechon.” Thanks for sharing!

  4. “It was difficult to wrap my head around some of the customs in Sardegna, but I am in their land, tis me that must adapt. ”

    I wish more had that attitude when the go elsewhere to live…

  5. “It was difficult to wrap my head around some of the customs in Sardegna, but I am in their land, tis me that must adapt. ” I 100% agree with you! Have you met those that put up a ruckus going on about how it is gross and disgusting etc…?

    Mmmm… that really looks delicious! What does it look like when it is out of the oven? Or are you still waiting for it to be ready then taking more photos?? LOL!!!!

    • Woman – I scoured my photo files for a cooked piglet but no avail. I’m usually 1/2 a bottle of red in by then. 😉

      Jo & Woman – I truly don’t understand why some ppl even bother to travel, if all they do is complain about the customs. Stay home in your own comforts, learn nothing.

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